Children need Joined Handwriting to Pass the Key Stage 2 Writing Assessments

Cursive igh join tall

Primary schools preparing their children for this year’s Key Stage 2 writing assessments have to take into account new government changes made to the “Teacher assessment frameworks at the end of key stage 2 For use in the 2017 to 2018”.

Helen Ward’s TES article (05/02/18) “Sats: Most teachers say writing assessment will not produce accurate results” highlights some of the concerns and confusion teacher have following the changes.

For instance,

“The changes mean that some of the elements of writing that children had to show last year are no longer necessary to meet the expected standard.

But, while children could meet the expected standard without neat handwriting last year, now they must “maintain legibility in joined handwriting when writing at speed”.”  H. Ward (05/02/18)

Bibliography

Helen Ward: TES article (05/02/18) “Sats: Most teachers say writing assessment will not produce accurate results”: https://www.tes.com/news/school-news/breaking-news/sats-most-teachers-say-writing-assessment-will-not-produce-accurate

Standard & Testing Agency 2017 “Teacher assessment frameworks at the end of key stage 2 For use in the 2017 to 2018”: Electronic version product code: STA/17/7957/e ISBN: 978-1-78644-414-1: download at www.gov.uk/government/publications.

Handwriting is a Physical Activity

Girl Cartoon Hold PenDated 14/09/17

Handwriting with fluidity, speed, accuracy and over longer periods of time requires a complex range of whole body and hand strengths and skills. So it is not surprising that many children find handwriting challenging.

For a good handwriting style children need to develop their:

  • Gross Motor Skills – so they can sit correctly for periods of time
  • Fine Motor Skills – so that they can hold and control the pencil as well as move the paper up the table as they write.
  • Motor Memory Skills – so they can recall how to form the letters.
  • Visual Memory Skills – so they recall what a particular letter looks like.
  • Spatial Awareness Skills– so they can place the letters correctly on the paper and in relation to one another.
  • Eye Tracking Skills– scanning from left to right so that the letters are formed and placed correctly.

If a child is struggling with handwriting it is important to take a closer look at their physical abilities. Getting them to do more of the paper and pencil activities is not the answer if they do not have all the appropriate key physical strengths to support their handwriting development.

Our assessment is simple to complete and does not need any specialist equipment. The important elements are; your knowledge of your own child and your observations of them at play and while they are engaged in normal day to day task.

Link to our Assessment page: bit.ly/1Aibiie

A better understanding of your child’s key skills abilities enables you to focus more effectively, through targeted physical games and activities, to help them build and develop their skills.

Link to our Physical Games page:  bit.ly/1yfbrHU

Handwriting is such an important skill as it engages the neurological pathways and working memory in a way that pressing a keyboard just doesn’t; so once mastered it helps to open up the doorways to other literacy skills such as phonics, reading, spelling and composition.