Week 3 of Our 5 Week Handwriting Lesson Program

Week 3 1

The third week of our handwriting program is ready for you to download. Today it introduces the ‘Top Exit Letters’ and revisits letters from the letter families already taught in week 1 – ‘Straight lines family’ and Week 2 – ‘Curves to start family’.

The free weekly set of worksheets can be downloaded, printed off and used alongside our letter formation animations.

Click on this link and it will take you to correct page of our website:

https://www.teachhandwriting.co.uk/covid-19-handwriting-lessons.html

5 Week Handwriting Lesson Program

Each week a new letter family will be introduced:

  1. Straight lines (available until Sunday 3rd May 2020).
  2. Curves to start
  3. Top exit
  4. Tunnel
  5. Hooks, loops and lines

There is a separate worksheet for each day:

Monday – Have a go worksheet

Today you can check if your child knows how to write the letters and if they are writing them correctly. If you know your child cannot form the letters in the letter family then show them the letter animations and then let them have a go.

Tuesday & Wednesday – Specific letter practise days

Each day focuses on different sets of letters from the letter family.

Thursday & Friday – Letter practise days

On these days letters from the letter family being taught and some letters from letter families already introduced are practised.

There are also “Rainbow” worksheets where your child can share with others what they have learnt and achieved over the week as well as appropriately sized practise paper for them.

We hope you find these useful. If you have any questions about this 5 week handwriting program please feel free to contact us through the contact us page and we will do our best to help.

Take care Lucy & Chris from Teach Children Ltd

Week 2 of Handwriting Lesson Program

Week 2 Handwriting 1

We posted the first week of our 5 Week Handwriting Lesson Program on 19th April 2020 which introduced the ‘straight lines family’. It is free 5 week, easy to use, handwriting program for you.

The second week of this handwriting program will be ready for you to download on Friday 24/04/20 and introduces the ‘curves to start family’.

The free weekly set of worksheets can be downloaded, printed off and used alongside our letter formation animations.

Click on this link and it will take you to correct page of our website:

https://www.teachhandwriting.co.uk/covid-19-handwriting-lessons.html

5 Week Handwriting Lesson Program

Each week a new letter family will be introduced:

  1. Straight lines
  2. Curves to start
  3. Top exit
  4. Tunnel
  5. Hooks, loops and lines

There is a separate worksheet for each day:

Monday – Have a go worksheet

Today you can check if your child knows how to write the letters and if they are writing them correctly. If you know your child cannot form the letters in the letter family then show them the letter animations and then let them have a go.

Tuesday & Wednesday – Specific letter practise days

Each day focuses on different sets of letters from the letter family.

Thursday & Friday – Letter practise days

On these days letters from the letter family being taught and some letters from letter families already introduced are practised.

There are also “Rainbow” worksheets where your child can share with others what they have learnt and achieved over the week as well as appropriately sized practise paper for them.

We hope you find these useful. If you have any questions about this 5 week handwriting program please feel free to contact us through the contact us page and we will do our best to help.

Take care Lucy & Chris from Teach Children Ltd

5 Week Handwriting Lesson Program

Due to the unusual times we find ourselves in, we have created an easy to use free 5 weeks handwriting program for you.

Starting from Monday 20th April 2020 and over the next 5 weeks we will provide you with a free weekly set of worksheets which can be downloaded, printed off and used alongside our letter formation animations.

Click on this link and it will take you to correct page of our website:

https://www.teachhandwriting.co.uk/covid-19-handwriting-lessons.html

5 Week Handwriting Lesson Program

Each week a new letter family will be introduced:

  1. Straight lines
  2. Curves to start
  3. Top exit
  4. Tunnel
  5. Hooks, loops and lines

Spring/Easter Drawing Activity Ideas – Supporting Pre-handwriting Pattern Development

Easter Banner 2

In these unusual times it can be easy to forget that it is the Easter holiday break.

We have put together some quick step by step Easter drawing ideas for you to try, using basic shapes such as circles, rectangles and triangles. It is amazing how, by using these simple shapes, you and your child can create fantastic Spring/Easter: cards, pictures mobiles or bunting: http://bit.ly/2kyeo3w

People have enjoyed seeing children’s’ rainbow pictures up in windows so adding some Spring/Easter pictures or mobiles can only add to the enjoyment.

Drawing pictures is a great way to help your child develop their pre-handwriting strokes and shape forming skills. As well as supporting shape, colour, pattern and language development.

The Best Pencil Grip for #Handwriting – Tripod Grip

Drawbridge flip 1

The Drawbridge Flip Method is a simple way of helping your child pick up a pencil and hold it correctly in the tripod grip for handwriting.

Follow this link for an instructional video for both left and right-handed writers on how to use the Drawbridge Flip method:

https://www.teachhandwriting.co.uk/whole-class-tripod-pencil-grip-teaching-ks1.html

Drawbridge Flip instructions:

  • Place the pencil on the table in front of the writing hand, so it forms a straight line up the table with the writing tip of the pencil pointing towards you.
  • Then using your thumb and index finger pinch the pencil either side of the shaft about 2 cm up from the tip for a right-handed writer and about 3 cm up for a left-handed writer. Dots or sticker may be placed on the pencil to help thumb and finger placement.
  • Pick the pencil up off the table and place the fingernail of the middle finger on to the pencil just above the tip.
  • Keep the ring and little finger gently curled in.
  • Push down with the middle finger so that the pencil moves up and over like a drawbridge, keep pushing until the pencil is supported in the cup (web of skin that joins the thumb, hand and index finger) and the pencil is resting on the inner edge of middle finger.
  • When writing, the end of the pencil will be angled towards the shoulder for right-handed writers and the elbow for left-handed writers.

Helping to Overcome Handwriting Difficulties

Boy head on desk 2

It can be difficult to identify why a child is having trouble learning to handwrite fluidly and with speed. This is because handwriting is a complex skill, requiring both physical skills and the knowledge of how to form and join letters correctly.

Where do you start?

Follow our step by step guide to identify where the problem may lie and then work with the child using our suggested solutions: http://bit.ly/2uFcUJF

Don’t miss the early steps, even though you think they may not be relevant to an older learner, as the child may be struggling because they have either missed an earlier stage of physical development or teaching.

Sometimes children need to be taken back before they can move forward.

Handwriting is a Physical Activity

cartoon pencil hold

Handwriting with fluidity, speed, accuracy and over longer periods of time requires a complex range of whole body and hand strengths and skills. So it is not surprising that many children find handwriting challenging.

For a good handwriting style children need to develop their:

  • Gross Motor Skills – so they can sit correctly for periods of time.
  • Fine Motor Skills – so that they can hold and control the pencil and move the paper up the table as they write.
  • Motor Memory Skills – so they can recall how to form the letters.
  • Visual Memory Skills – so they recall what a particular letter looks like.
  • Spatial Awareness Skills– so they can place the letters correctly on the paper and in relation to one another.
  • Eye Tracking Skills– scanning from left to right so that the letters are formed and placed correctly.

If a child is struggling with handwriting it is important to take a closer look at their physical abilities. If they do not have all the appropriate key physical strengths to support their handwriting development getting them to do more of the paper and pencil activities is not the answer.

Our assessments are simple to complete and do not need any specialist equipment. The important elements are; your knowledge of the child and your observations of them at play and while they are engaged in normal day to day task.

You will find our assessments on the ‘Key Strengths needed for handwriting’ page: http://bit.ly/2D1RKKs

A better understanding of a child’s key skills abilities enables you to focus more effectively, through targeted physical games and activities, to help them build and develop their skills.

You will find ‘Games to build gross and fine motor skills’ here: http://bit.ly/2FhFkR7  and ‘Games for the other physical skills’ such as visual memory and eye tracking here: http://bit.ly/2M350S1

Handwriting is such an important skill as it engages the neurological pathways and working memory in a way that pressing a keyboard just doesn’t; so once mastered it helps to open up the doorways to other literacy skills such as phonics, reading, spelling and composition.

Half-term Fun – Clothes Peg Games

Clothes peg games 2

Some fun indoor activities may be the order of the day for this half term as the weather is not so hot.

This is a very simple idea which children love because they can take greater ownership of it. The aim of the activity is to help build up hand and finger strength through using the pegs; however it can have a dual purpose, helping to keep track of the week by using it as a timetable or for learning spellings or maths activities, as well as supporting the development of language skills.

You do not need anything fancy, just some string (for the washing line), clothes pegs and pieces of paper or card to peg onto the washing line. The washing line can be a permanent fixture or you can just pop it up when you need to use it.

The clothes line needs to be at a height suitable for your child to peg things on to (placed against a wall is a safe option so that no-one can walk into it by accident and hurt themselves).

There are a whole range of games that can be played using this simple washing line and pegs concept:

  1. Memory games – Get your child to peg up 5 to 10 different pictures or items on the line. Then give them 1 minute to remember the items. Once the time is up ask them to look away, or close their eyes, and then you remove one or more of the items. Get them to look back at the line. Can they work out what is missing?
    • You could try just moving one or two of the items around. Can they figure out which ones are in the wrong place and put them back in their correct place?
    • Try swapping an item for something new, which your child did not hang up on the line. Can they work out which is the new item on the line?
  1. Odd One Out – Hang pictures on the line that belong together. Can they pick out the odd item on the line and explain why it is the odd one out.
    • They could all be pictures of fruit with a picture of some clothing
    • They could be shapes with straight sides and one with curves
    • They could all be animals but all are wild with only one being domestic
  1. Sorting – Ask your child to sort all the pictures or items from a selection and to hang all the identical things on the washing line. They could all be the same;
    • Colour
    • Shape
    • Type
  1. Pattern Work – Using pictures, different colour and shaped paper or items create different patterns. The patterns can be based on colour, size or type of object. You can create a pattern sequence on the washing line and then ask your child to try and copy the sequence. Can they explain the pattern and create their own for you to copy and explain?
  1. Pairing or What is the Same? – Hang a range of pictures or items on the line, making sure that some of the items can be paired together because they are exactly the same. They could match because;
    • They are exactly the same e.g. a pair of socks
    • Match numbers to a picture with the same number of items on
    • Match capital to lower-case letters
    • Or have items that can be put together because they are both from the same set, for example they are types of fruit or are the same colour.

Teaching Letter Joins – A Systematic Approach

Joins A & W 2

We would recommend teaching joins in join type groups, whether your child has learnt cursive or continuous cursive single letter fonts.

Teaching the join types in their groups helps a child to understand the directional pushes and pulls required to successfully join the different letter combinations.

There are 4 main groups of letter joins; bottom joins, bottom to “c” shape joins, “e” joins (top and bottom join strokes) and top joins.

Moving from Cursive Single Letters to Joining

There are seven join strokes to be taught. Most children will find the bottom joins the easiest to achieve, as it only requires the extension of the exit stroke they already put on the letters. The bottom to “c” shape joins can be tricky at first but soon mastered. The joins that tend to cause the most confusion and difficulty are the “e” joiners and top exit joiners.

I would recommend teaching the bottom joins first, then the ‘e’ joins and finally the top exit letter joins.

Moving from Continuous Cursive Single Letters to Joining

There are three join strokes to be taught. The easiest is the bottom exit letters (the majority of the letters), all a child has to do is write the letters closer together without lifting their pencil off the paper. Only the top to “e” and top joiners need to be taught for continuous cursive, as the nature of the font style means that the lead-in and exit strokes needed to join the majority of letter combinations have already been taught.

I would recommend teaching the bottom joins first, then the top exit to ‘e’ join and finally the top exit letter joins.

For our free join animations and worksheets: http://bit.ly/2F9P7cI

For tips to support the teaching of joins check out our Teaching Tips section:  http://bit.ly/2AaX8sk

When to Introduce Joined Handwriting

CC & Cursive 1

Here at Teach Children we believe that a child is only ready to start learning to join their handwriting when:

  • They have learnt to form all 26 lower case letters correctly
  • Letters are of a consistent and suitable size (not necessarily the perfect size, remember big is beautiful)
  • Letters are positioned appropriately on the writing line as well as in relation to one another.

Children generally begin to join letters between the ages of 6 to 7 years old, depending on the handwriting font style being taught. Those taught a continuous cursive font style from the beginning tend to join much earlier due to the nature of this font (for some by the end of their Reception Year).

Children do not need to be able to remember how to correctly form all their capital letters before they are taught how to join their letters. This is because capital letters never join to the lower-case letters in a word. However, for these children correct capital letter formation needs to be taught alongside the introduction of letter joins.

The ultimate aim is for a child to develop a good handwriting style; which means;

  • They can produce and maintain a good speed
  • Have a fluid hand movement that is comfortable
  • Letters are of a consistent and appropriate size, positioned correctly
  • Handwriting is legible (so others can read it easily).

For some children (mainly SEND pupils) this may mean that they will always print or use a single letter form of writing as learning to join is just not appropriate. But that does not mean they will not comply with the bullet points above.